Despite improved access, millions of women in South Sudan still walk miles to get clean water – South Sudan

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According to UNOCHA’s latest humanitarian needs overview in South Sudan, more than 6.1 million people have insufficient or no access to safe drinking water, 50% and 54% of whom are women and children respectively.

Lack of access today means that millions of women in the country still walk for eight hours or even more to access water that is not even clean and can pose health risks to women. communities.

Nyanyok, a 35-year-old mother, shared her struggles noting that women who suffered due to insufficient access to clean water supply before; World Vision has installed the solar powered water system in the town of Malakal in Upper Nile State.

To make access to safe and adequate water a reality in many parts of the country, it is necessary to conserve groundwater, involve the local community management structure for Isaiah Sei, National WASH Technical Officer of World Vision .

“We can continue to increase access to clean water supply within a reasonable distance for women in charge of daily drudgery by also investing in groundwater exploration, development of boreholes through motorized energy solar,” adds Sei.

Nyinkak, Nyanyok’s 11-year-old daughter, told how their lives changed when water points were installed near their homes. She is able to help her mother and she can do it safely. Even getting ready for school was convenient as water is available for their washing needs

Sei, a 12-year WASH veteran, including four years serving in South Sudan, saw the progress in people’s lives, especially women, as World Vision strengthened its water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH).

He still remembers how the water supply available in Upper Nile State stopped the perennial cycles of cholera and diarrhea outbreaks. “We have come a long way, but there is still a long way to go. Many communities still need a reliable, sustainable and safe water supply,” he says.

The rehabilitation of 65 boreholes, two community spring water projects and the upgrading of seven boreholes with a solar powered motorized system produced an average daily supply of 1,414,140 liters for 67,340 people in Western Equatoria States , Bahr El Ghazal and Warrap in a recent report.

He still remembers how the water supply available in Upper Nile State stopped the perennial cycles of cholera and diarrhea outbreaks. “We have come a long way, but there is still a long way to go. Many communities still need a reliable, sustainable and safe water supply,” he says.

In total, World Vision was able to provide over 386,000 people with access to clean drinking water for safe consumption, including in Upper Nile and Central Equatoria states.

At the same time, 47 health facilities have been equipped with functional water sources, with improved sanitation facilities, reinforcing the campaign against malnutrition and various preventable diseases.

This has contributed to reducing the incidence of water-borne diseases and preventing epidemics, increasing food production and incomes through irrigation of farms and water supply for livestock, addressing to cattle breeders.

World Vision’s WASH program in South Sudan is made up of six projects managed by 70 staff and 43 government seconded staff. Its main partners are the National WASH Cluster, the National, State and County Department of Lands, Housing and Utilities, and the Department of Water and Sanitation.

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